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PEST ID

Essential Pest Control in Tucson, AZ

Please click on any icon below to learn more about common household pests active in our desert environment. The pest ID center is grouped into common categories. If you cannot find a particular pest please contact our office and we can assist you in identifying your pest problem.

Ants

Argentine Ant
Big Head Ant
Cone Ant
Crazy Ant
Fire Ant
Harvester Ant
Honey Pot Ant
Leafcutter Ant
Rover Ant
Velvet Ant

Argentine Ant

Description:
Worker ants can range from light to dark brown and are 1/12 to 1/8 inch long and have 12 segmented antennae.

Behavior:
Argentine Ants can adapt to a variety of different environments. They will typically nest outside in moist soil, along sidewalks, or underneath structures. Nesting sites are commonly located close to food and water sources. Argentine Ants have the ability to build super colonies with hundreds of queens. To support such a large population, they will forage for food day and night. These ants have a diverse diet, but prefer foods high in sugar content such as honey dew, fruit juices, and plant secretions.

Control:
A thorough inspection must be conducted when dealing with this species of ant. Sanitation improvements around and inside a structure can go a long way. Reduction of moisture and harborage areas will greatly assist chemical control. If possible, identifying nesting sites and treating them directly is very effective. When the colonies sites are not accessible, the use of baits and specialized insecticides are employed.

Fun fact:
Argentine Ant super colonies can grow at a rate of 200 meters per year.

Big Head Ant

Description:
Big Headed Ants have two classes of workers. The first class act as defenders of the colony and have very large heads in proportion to their bodies. The second class workers have smaller heads that narrow between the eyes.

Behavior:
Big Headed Ants are known to nest under logs or rocks. It is also common for Big Headed Ants to nest under the slab of a building. They often enter structures through cracks or seams in the foundation. Even though they do not usually nest inside of homes, they will often enter in search of food and water. Indoor problems with these ants often start outdoors.

Control:
Prevention techniques include eliminating piles of lumber, brick, or other debris that could be possible nesting sites. Landscape mulch should be less than 2 inches thick and at least 10-12 inches from the foundation. Control often requires baits that ants take back to colony to share.

Fun fact:
Big Headed Ants have been known to construct mud tubes similar to those of the Subterranean Termite.

Cone Ant

Description:
Cone AntThe Cone Ant measures up to ¼ inch. Their color can be black, red or dark brown. Their nests are volcano-shaped and 3 to 4 inches in diameter.

Behavior:
Cone Ants nest in the soil and prefer open arid habitats. They forage randomly and feed on insects and other proteins. They are most active late in the day through the night time hours. This ant can have several mounds within 2 to 3 feet of each other.

Control:
Protein based baits are most effective when dealing with these ants. Pest control maintenance programs help reduce occurrences.

Fun Fact:
Cone Ants are looked at as beneficial because they often prey on undesirable ant species such as the Fire Ant.

Crazy Ant

Description:
Crazy Ants have extremely long legs and antennae and are approximately 1/8 inch long. They are black in color.

Behavior:
Crazy Ants are known for creating massive colonies with thousands of workers and many queens. These ants nest under items found on the ground, under potted plants, within landscape mulch, and under ground cover. Crazy Ants can also nest inside of buildings beneath carpeting and in wall voids. They prefer to feed on animal matter, grease and other insects, but will also eat sweets.

Control:
Prevention techniques include eliminating piles of lumber, brick, or other debris that could be possible nesting sites. Landscape mulch should be less than 2 inches thick and at least 10-12 inches from the foundation. Direct insecticide applications to the nest sites are the most effective means of control.

Fun Fact:
Crazy Ants have been found on top floors of large apartment buildings in New York.

Fire Ant

Description:
The Fire Ant has a shiny bright red head and body with a black abdomen. They can measure up to 1/3 inch.

Behavior:
Fire Ants are most active at night. Their nests are shallow and usually look like a group of small mounds. They prefer moist areas such as lawns, underneath boards or rocks. They tend to forage in trails for both proteins and sugars. Fire Ants will frequently move their colonies. Workers have a painful sting.

Control:
Prevention techniques include eliminating piles of lumber, brick, or other debris that could be possible nesting sites. Landscape mulch should be at least 10-12 inches from the foundation and less than 2 inches thick. Control often requires baits that ants take back to colony to share or direct insecticide application to the nesting sites.

Fun Fact:
These ants will wait to sting until there are multiple ants on their victim to create a more potent message.

Harvester Ant

Description:
This ant is red-orange or black and carries its abdomen high in the air when running. They are typically 3/8 inch in length.

Behavior:
Harvester Ants gather seeds as their primary food source. They generally clear large spherical areas completely free of any plants or debris around their nest entrance. These ants will aggressively protect their colonies by biting and stinging.

Control:
Reduce available water sources such as leaking pipes and irrigation. These ants are also discouraged by gravel or rocks covering the dirt. The use of special ant baits and direct insecticide applications are the most successful methods of control.

Fun Fact:
Harvester Ants swarm in the summer to find mates and spawn new colonies. The swarms will usually gather around a high point such as a chimney, tall trees, or towers. This is called “hill-topping.”

Honey Pot Ant

Description:
Honey Pot Ant workers range from ¼ to ½ inch. They can be reddish-tan to dark brown in color. They have large black eyes, elbowed antennae, and two long mandibles.

Behavior:
These ants live underground in colonies. There are two classes of workers. The first class of workers can be found actively foraging after summer rains where they collect plant nectar and water. They then return to the colony to fill the abdomens of the secondary workers. Their abdomens can grow to be 5 times their original size. These workers will store the nectar for seasons of drought for the rest of the colony.

Control:
Honey Pot Ants are generally not found indoors. If control measures are needed, gel baits and direct material applications are effective.

Fun Fact:
Honey Pot Ants can burst if they are too filled with nectar.

Leafcutter Ant

Description:
This ant is a reddish rust color. The workers measure 1/12” to ½” in length. They make large volcano-like mounds.

Behavior:
Leaf Cutter Ants do what their name states. They are capable of stripping a small tree or shrub of it’s foliage over night. Leaf Cutter Ants collect the leaves and take them under ground where they are stored. The leaves grow a fungus that the ants harvest as food. They prefer well drained or sandy soil to build their nests that they use for several years.

Control:
Leaf Cutter Ants are best controlled with direct insecticide applications to their nesting sites. Several gallons of material may be needed.

Fun Fact:
Leaf Cutter Ant colonies can extend down to 12 feet underground.

Rover Ant

Description:
The Rover Ant is very small. They measure up to 1/12 inch. They have 9 segmented antennae and relatively large eyes. They range from black to brown in color. Rover Ant alates are often found floating in pools in the summer months.

Behavior:
Rover Ants will typically nest underneath stones and leaf litter. They are often found trailing up mesquite trees. They feed on tree sap, plant nectar, and other sweet liquids. Rover Ants are not aggressive but show up in large numbers in homes. These ants are most active in the spring and summer seasons.

Control:
Controlling Rover Ants is challenging. Landscape mulch should be less than 2 inches thick and at least 10-12 inches from the foundation. Direct insecticide applications to the nest sites are the most effective means of control. When the nest cannot be located, gel baits and specialized insecticides are used.

Fun Fact:
Rover Ants were introduced to southern Arizona around 2003.

Velvet Ant

Description:
The Velvet Ant is actually a solitary wingless wasp. They measure up to 1 inch in length. Velvet Ants are covered in colorful fuzzy hairs. Their color ranges from yellow, brown, red, and black.

Behavior:
Velvet Ants nest in the ground. They prefer pastures and fields with sandy soil. Food sources include nectar and water. The immature stages are parasites to bees, wasps, and ants that nest in the ground. The adults are not aggressive; however they possess a very painful sting if handled. In fact, there is no possible way to hold a velvet ant with two fingers without its long stinger penetrating the skin.

Control:
There is no major control technique for the Velvet Ant because of their solitary nature. A pest control program will help reduce the likelihood of finding a velvet ant around the home.

Fun Fact:
The Velvet Ant is also known as the “cow killer” because they can sting a cow’s throat if accidentally eaten. The throat will swell shut and cow will die.

Argentine Ant

Description:
Worker ants can range from light to dark brown and are 1/12 to 1/8 inch long and have 12 segmented antennae.

Behavior:
Argentine Ants can adapt to a variety of different environments. They will typically nest outside in moist soil, along sidewalks, or underneath structures. Nesting sites are commonly located close to food and water sources. Argentine Ants have the ability to build super colonies with hundreds of queens. To support such a large population, they will forage for food day and night. These ants have a diverse diet, but prefer foods high in sugar content such as honey dew, fruit juices, and plant secretions.

Control:
A thorough inspection must be conducted when dealing with this species of ant. Sanitation improvements around and inside a structure can go a long way. Reduction of moisture and harborage areas will greatly assist chemical control. If possible, identifying nesting sites and treating them directly is very effective. When the colonies sites are not accessible, the use of baits and specialized insecticides are employed.

Fun fact:
Argentine Ant super colonies can grow at a rate of 200 meters per year.

Big Head Ant

Description:
Big Headed Ants have two classes of workers. The first class act as defenders of the colony and have very large heads in proportion to their bodies. The second class workers have smaller heads that narrow between the eyes.

Behavior:
Big Headed Ants are known to nest under logs or rocks. It is also common for Big Headed Ants to nest under the slab of a building. They often enter structures through cracks or seams in the foundation. Even though they do not usually nest inside of homes, they will often enter in search of food and water. Indoor problems with these ants often start outdoors.

Control:
Prevention techniques include eliminating piles of lumber, brick, or other debris that could be possible nesting sites. Landscape mulch should be less than 2 inches thick and at least 10-12 inches from the foundation. Control often requires baits that ants take back to colony to share.

Fun fact:
Big Headed Ants have been known to construct mud tubes similar to those of the Subterranean Termite.

Cone Ant

Description:
Cone AntThe Cone Ant measures up to ¼ inch. Their color can be black, red or dark brown. Their nests are volcano-shaped and 3 to 4 inches in diameter.

Behavior:
Cone Ants nest in the soil and prefer open arid habitats. They forage randomly and feed on insects and other proteins. They are most active late in the day through the night time hours. This ant can have several mounds within 2 to 3 feet of each other.

Control:
Protein based baits are most effective when dealing with these ants. Pest control maintenance programs help reduce occurrences.

Fun Fact:
Cone Ants are looked at as beneficial because they often prey on undesirable ant species such as the Fire Ant.

Crazy Ant

Description:
Crazy Ants have extremely long legs and antennae and are approximately 1/8 inch long. They are black in color.

Behavior:
Crazy Ants are known for creating massive colonies with thousands of workers and many queens. These ants nest under items found on the ground, under potted plants, within landscape mulch, and under ground cover. Crazy Ants can also nest inside of buildings beneath carpeting and in wall voids. They prefer to feed on animal matter, grease and other insects, but will also eat sweets.

Control:
Prevention techniques include eliminating piles of lumber, brick, or other debris that could be possible nesting sites. Landscape mulch should be less than 2 inches thick and at least 10-12 inches from the foundation. Direct insecticide applications to the nest sites are the most effective means of control.

Fun Fact:
Crazy Ants have been found on top floors of large apartment buildings in New York.

Fire Ant

Description:
The Fire Ant has a shiny bright red head and body with a black abdomen. They can measure up to 1/3 inch.

Behavior:
Fire Ants are most active at night. Their nests are shallow and usually look like a group of small mounds. They prefer moist areas such as lawns, underneath boards or rocks. They tend to forage in trails for both proteins and sugars. Fire Ants will frequently move their colonies. Workers have a painful sting.

Control:
Prevention techniques include eliminating piles of lumber, brick, or other debris that could be possible nesting sites. Landscape mulch should be at least 10-12 inches from the foundation and less than 2 inches thick. Control often requires baits that ants take back to colony to share or direct insecticide application to the nesting sites.

Fun Fact:
These ants will wait to sting until there are multiple ants on their victim to create a more potent message.

Harvester Ant

Description:
This ant is red-orange or black and carries its abdomen high in the air when running. They are typically 3/8 inch in length.

Behavior:
Harvester Ants gather seeds as their primary food source. They generally clear large spherical areas completely free of any plants or debris around their nest entrance. These ants will aggressively protect their colonies by biting and stinging.

Control:
Reduce available water sources such as leaking pipes and irrigation. These ants are also discouraged by gravel or rocks covering the dirt. The use of special ant baits and direct insecticide applications are the most successful methods of control.

Fun Fact:
Harvester Ants swarm in the summer to find mates and spawn new colonies. The swarms will usually gather around a high point such as a chimney, tall trees, or towers. This is called “hill-topping.”

Honey Pot Ant

Description:
Honey Pot Ant workers range from ¼ to ½ inch. They can be reddish-tan to dark brown in color. They have large black eyes, elbowed antennae, and two long mandibles.

Behavior:
These ants live underground in colonies. There are two classes of workers. The first class of workers can be found actively foraging after summer rains where they collect plant nectar and water. They then return to the colony to fill the abdomens of the secondary workers. Their abdomens can grow to be 5 times their original size. These workers will store the nectar for seasons of drought for the rest of the colony.

Control:
Honey Pot Ants are generally not found indoors. If control measures are needed, gel baits and direct material applications are effective.

Fun Fact:
Honey Pot Ants can burst if they are too filled with nectar.

Leafcutter Ant

Description:
This ant is a reddish rust color. The workers measure 1/12” to ½” in length. They make large volcano-like mounds.

Behavior:
Leaf Cutter Ants do what their name states. They are capable of stripping a small tree or shrub of it’s foliage over night. Leaf Cutter Ants collect the leaves and take them under ground where they are stored. The leaves grow a fungus that the ants harvest as food. They prefer well drained or sandy soil to build their nests that they use for several years.

Control:
Leaf Cutter Ants are best controlled with direct insecticide applications to their nesting sites. Several gallons of material may be needed.

Fun Fact:
Leaf Cutter Ant colonies can extend down to 12 feet underground.

Rover Ant

Description:
The Rover Ant is very small. They measure up to 1/12 inch. They have 9 segmented antennae and relatively large eyes. They range from black to brown in color. Rover Ant alates are often found floating in pools in the summer months.

Behavior:
Rover Ants will typically nest underneath stones and leaf litter. They are often found trailing up mesquite trees. They feed on tree sap, plant nectar, and other sweet liquids. Rover Ants are not aggressive but show up in large numbers in homes. These ants are most active in the spring and summer seasons.

Control:
Controlling Rover Ants is challenging. Landscape mulch should be less than 2 inches thick and at least 10-12 inches from the foundation. Direct insecticide applications to the nest sites are the most effective means of control. When the nest cannot be located, gel baits and specialized insecticides are used.

Fun Fact:
Rover Ants were introduced to southern Arizona around 2003.

Velvet Ant

Description:
The Velvet Ant is actually a solitary wingless wasp. They measure up to 1 inch in length. Velvet Ants are covered in colorful fuzzy hairs. Their color ranges from yellow, brown, red, and black.

Behavior:
Velvet Ants nest in the ground. They prefer pastures and fields with sandy soil. Food sources include nectar and water. The immature stages are parasites to bees, wasps, and ants that nest in the ground. The adults are not aggressive; however they possess a very painful sting if handled. In fact, there is no possible way to hold a velvet ant with two fingers without its long stinger penetrating the skin.

Control:
There is no major control technique for the Velvet Ant because of their solitary nature. A pest control program will help reduce the likelihood of finding a velvet ant around the home.

Fun Fact:
The Velvet Ant is also known as the “cow killer” because they can sting a cow’s throat if accidentally eaten. The throat will swell shut and cow will die.

Bugs

Bed Bug
Brown Dog Tick
Cat Flea
Kissing Bug
Mosquito

Bed Bug

Description:
Adults are 1/4” to 5/8” long and up to 1/8” wide. They are a reddish-brown mahogany color and their bodies are flattened and oval shaped. Although the bugs are covered with tiny hairs, they appear shiny when seen. Bed Bugs have piercing-sucking mouthparts.

Behavior:
A host, harborage, and warmth are the bed bugs primary need. They prefer to feed in dark conditions, usually in the night time hours. Because of their flattened bodies, they are extremely good at hiding in small cracks and crevices. Common harborages include, but are not limited to folds and tufts of mattresses, coils of springs, posts of bedsteads, and upholstery of chairs and sofas. Harborage areas will expand with heavier infestations. Signs of infestations include their fecal matter, eggs, and skin castes. The Bed Bug’s bite is painless and can last up to 15 minutes. Skin irritations from bites are caused by a reaction to the Bed Bug saliva.

Control:
The first step to control is a thorough inspection done by one of our professionals. We will determine whether or not there is a bed bug infestation, what areas need to be treated, and what preparations are needed for the treatments. Treatments primarily consist of precise applications of insecticides into known bed bug harborages and potential hiding places throughout the living space. Bedding encasements, vacuuming, and steaming may also be implemented. At least two additional visits are done following the initial treatment. These follow-ups are to re-inspect infested areas and apply additional control measures.

Fun fact:
An adult Bed Bug can survive for over a year without a blood meal.

Brown Dog Tick

Description:
The Brown Dog Tick may reach nearly 1/4-inch in length. However, when engorged, the female may measure about 1/2-inch. This tick is a dark reddish brown with no markings.

Behavior:
Brown Dog Ticks primarily feed on dogs, but will also attach themselves to many other animals and even people. On dogs, adult ticks are usually found on the ears and between the toes. The Brown Dog Tick will attach itself to a dog by crawling up on grasses, bushes, and other shrubbery. It can be easily brought into a home on the family dog. They will commonly lay their eggs in cracks and crevices. Ticks can survive up to eight months without a blood meal. The brown dog tick can transmit diseases to humans.

Control:
An inspection is crucial in order to identify where the ticks are hiding. Removal of organic debris from the yard will reduce hiding places for the ticks. Dogs should be dipped and treated with tick control products. Exterior treatments include granules, residual sprays, and dusts. Interior treatments target cracks and crevices throughout the building.

Fun fact:
Female ticks have the ability to lay up to 5,000 eggs at one time.

Cat Flea

Description:
A Cat Flea measures about 1/6-inch in length and are laterally flattened.

Behavior:
The Cat Flea is the most common flea that infests animals. Cat Fleas can complete their metamorphosis of egg, larva and pupa stage in 30 days. Eggs are oval-shaped and typically fall from the host animal’s fur to the ground. They remain there until they emerge into larvae. Larvae feed on the fecal matter of adults. Eventually they become pupae and mature into adult cat fleas. Adult cat fleas will live on their host and reproduce after blood meals.

Control:
In order for control measures to be successful, the host animal must be dipped and treated with specialized flea products. Infested items must be washed or cleaned. Carpets should be vacuumed thoroughly and the vacuum bag disposed of. Insecticide applications include growth regulators and residuals.

Fun fact:
Females can produce up to 360 eggs per day.

Kissing Bug

Description:
The Kissing Bug is about 1 inch in length. They have a cone-shaped head with short curved mouthparts. Some species have an orange and black mixture of color on their back. Kissing Bugs have a set of wings that enables them to fly.

Behavior:
Kissing Bugs are active in the night. They are parasites that feed on the blood of mammals. They are often associated with Pack Rats and live in their dens. Kissing Bugs can also bite humans. They are often attracted into structures from exterior lighting. Kissing Bugs are a known vector for various diseases including Chagas Disease.

Control:
When these bugs are inside a building, there is usually a rodent problem. Cleaning away Pack Rat dens is a great way to reduce problems with these insects. Yellow “bug” lights will also be less attractive for Kissing Bugs. Pest control maintenance programs are also effective in managing Kissing Bugs.

Fun fact:
Kissing Bugs got their name because it was once believed they will only bite a person on the lips.

Mosquito

Description:
Mosquitoes larvae have a three segmented body and are 1/8” to 1/4” inches long. The adults are 1/8” to 3/8” long with a scaly, gray body. It has two wings and a long proboscis with piercing-sucking mouthparts. The antennae have feathery qualities.

Behavior:
Mosquitoes are most likely to feed within 100 feet from their breeding sight, but can fly up to a mile and half for feeding. These insects will not only feed on blood, but they are also equipped to feed on sugars from the nectar in plants and flowers. The males’ sole purpose is to mate, and they find favorable feeding areas with their sense of temperature, sight and scent.

Control:
A thorough inspection is needed when treating for mosquitoes. Breeding and resting sites must be identified. Breeding areas must be altered or treated with a biological agent. Areas where adults are resting can be treated with a residual insecticide.

Fun fact:
These insects can see heat radiating from humans and animals because they are equipped with infrared vision. This is how they can tell what your body temperature is.

Bed Bug

Description:
Adults are 1/4” to 5/8” long and up to 1/8” wide. They are a reddish-brown mahogany color and their bodies are flattened and oval shaped. Although the bugs are covered with tiny hairs, they appear shiny when seen. Bed Bugs have piercing-sucking mouthparts.

Behavior:
A host, harborage, and warmth are the bed bugs primary need. They prefer to feed in dark conditions, usually in the night time hours. Because of their flattened bodies, they are extremely good at hiding in small cracks and crevices. Common harborages include, but are not limited to folds and tufts of mattresses, coils of springs, posts of bedsteads, and upholstery of chairs and sofas. Harborage areas will expand with heavier infestations. Signs of infestations include their fecal matter, eggs, and skin castes. The Bed Bug’s bite is painless and can last up to 15 minutes. Skin irritations from bites are caused by a reaction to the Bed Bug saliva.

Control:
The first step to control is a thorough inspection done by one of our professionals. We will determine whether or not there is a bed bug infestation, what areas need to be treated, and what preparations are needed for the treatments. Treatments primarily consist of precise applications of insecticides into known bed bug harborages and potential hiding places throughout the living space. Bedding encasements, vacuuming, and steaming may also be implemented. At least two additional visits are done following the initial treatment. These follow-ups are to re-inspect infested areas and apply additional control measures.

Fun fact:
An adult Bed Bug can survive for over a year without a blood meal.

Brown Dog Tick

Description:
The Brown Dog Tick may reach nearly 1/4-inch in length. However, when engorged, the female may measure about 1/2-inch. This tick is a dark reddish brown with no markings.

Behavior:
Brown Dog Ticks primarily feed on dogs, but will also attach themselves to many other animals and even people. On dogs, adult ticks are usually found on the ears and between the toes. The Brown Dog Tick will attach itself to a dog by crawling up on grasses, bushes, and other shrubbery. It can be easily brought into a home on the family dog. They will commonly lay their eggs in cracks and crevices. Ticks can survive up to eight months without a blood meal. The brown dog tick can transmit diseases to humans.

Control:
An inspection is crucial in order to identify where the ticks are hiding. Removal of organic debris from the yard will reduce hiding places for the ticks. Dogs should be dipped and treated with tick control products. Exterior treatments include granules, residual sprays, and dusts. Interior treatments target cracks and crevices throughout the building.

Fun fact:
Female ticks have the ability to lay up to 5,000 eggs at one time.

Cat Flea

Description:
A Cat Flea measures about 1/6-inch in length and are laterally flattened.

Behavior:
The Cat Flea is the most common flea that infests animals. Cat Fleas can complete their metamorphosis of egg, larva and pupa stage in 30 days. Eggs are oval-shaped and typically fall from the host animal’s fur to the ground. They remain there until they emerge into larvae. Larvae feed on the fecal matter of adults. Eventually they become pupae and mature into adult cat fleas. Adult cat fleas will live on their host and reproduce after blood meals.

Control:
In order for control measures to be successful, the host animal must be dipped and treated with specialized flea products. Infested items must be washed or cleaned. Carpets should be vacuumed thoroughly and the vacuum bag disposed of. Insecticide applications include growth regulators and residuals.

Fun fact:
Females can produce up to 360 eggs per day.

Kissing Bug

Description:
The Kissing Bug is about 1 inch in length. They have a cone-shaped head with short curved mouthparts. Some species have an orange and black mixture of color on their back. Kissing Bugs have a set of wings that enables them to fly.

Behavior:
Kissing Bugs are active in the night. They are parasites that feed on the blood of mammals. They are often associated with Pack Rats and live in their dens. Kissing Bugs can also bite humans. They are often attracted into structures from exterior lighting. Kissing Bugs are a known vector for various diseases including Chagas Disease.

Control:
When these bugs are inside a building, there is usually a rodent problem. Cleaning away Pack Rat dens is a great way to reduce problems with these insects. Yellow “bug” lights will also be less attractive for Kissing Bugs. Pest control maintenance programs are also effective in managing Kissing Bugs.

Fun fact:
Kissing Bugs got their name because it was once believed they will only bite a person on the lips.

Mosquito

Description:
Mosquitoes larvae have a three segmented body and are 1/8” to 1/4” inches long. The adults are 1/8” to 3/8” long with a scaly, gray body. It has two wings and a long proboscis with piercing-sucking mouthparts. The antennae have feathery qualities.

Behavior:
Mosquitoes are most likely to feed within 100 feet from their breeding sight, but can fly up to a mile and half for feeding. These insects will not only feed on blood, but they are also equipped to feed on sugars from the nectar in plants and flowers. The males’ sole purpose is to mate, and they find favorable feeding areas with their sense of temperature, sight and scent.

Control:
A thorough inspection is needed when treating for mosquitoes. Breeding and resting sites must be identified. Breeding areas must be altered or treated with a biological agent. Areas where adults are resting can be treated with a residual insecticide.

Fun fact:
These insects can see heat radiating from humans and animals because they are equipped with infrared vision. This is how they can tell what your body temperature is.

Bees, Wasps and Flies

Bumble Bee
Clothes Moth
Drain Fly
Fruit Fly
Honey Bee
Horse Fly
House Fly
Mud Dauber
Paper Wasp

Bumble Bee

Description:
A bumble bee can be up to 1 inch in length. They are usually black with yellow stripes on the thorax and abdomen.

Behavior:
Bumble bees live in colonies. Each spring a queen will find an appropriate nesting site and form her colony. Nesting sites are often abandoned rodent burrows underneath concrete or wood piles. Her first eggs grow into workers that feed on pollen and nectar. The bees are capable of a painful sting when defending their nest. The colony produces several queens in the fall. These queens will begin new colonies in the spring season.

Control:
Reducing the amount of rodents and their burrows will help prevent bumblebees from nesting. A bumble bee can be aggressive, so control should be carried out by a professional. Direct insecticide applications to nest areas are very effective.

Fun fact:
Bumble bees do produce honey, but it is not edible to humans.

Clothes Moth

Description:
Adults are about 7–8 mm in length when the wings are folded back over the body. The wings are a golden buff color with a fringe of long hairs on the margins. The head has a tuft of reddish hairs. Mature larvae are 12–13 mm long. The bodies are white or cream with a brown head capsule.

Behavior:
It is common to find the larvae feeding under cuffs, collars, and other hidden parts of clothing. Mature larvae feed on woolens beneath a constructed blanket of silk, feces, and pieces of the food source.

Control:
If infested, clothing, blankets, and tapestries should be laundered or dry cleaned, and stored in an airtight container or bag. Small carpets and throw rugs can be beaten and brushed while hanging from an outside line to remove most, if not all, eggs and larvae. Large area rugs, carpets and large infestation should be treated by a professional.

Fun fact:
Depending on temperature and humidity, total developmental time (from egg to adult) varies from one to three months and can extend up to three or more years in some situations.

Drain Fly

Description:
Drain flies range from light gray to tan body and are about 1/16 inch long. The flies appear fuzzy because both the body and the wings are covered with long hairs. For this reason, they are also known as Moth Flies.

Behavior:
Drain Flies prefer the dark and are usually found on walls close to moisture sources. They lay their eggs in organic build-up typically found in drains. The larvae can survive extreme temperature swings and low levels of oxygen. They have jaws that enable them to burrow deep into layers of sludge and build-up.

Control:
Sanitary improvements are most effective when dealing with Drain Flies. Drains should be thoroughly cleaned. A common misconception is to poor hot water and bleach down the drain. This will have effect as the larva burrow deep into organic build up. There are several micro biological enzymes that can be used to maintain clean drains. These products eat away slime and sludge. Space fogging to knock down adults is not effective, the breading sites must be eliminated for control.

Fun fact:
In small numbers, Drain Fly Larvae are considered helpful because they break down materials that cause drain clogs.

Fruit Fly

Description:
Fruit Flies are 1/8 inch long. They are tan with red eyes. Their wings fold over their bodies.

Behavior:
Fruit Flies are commonly brought into buildings on fruits and vegetables. The larva feed on yeasts that are produced from ripening and decaying organic matter. Adults tend to rest close to their breeding sites.

Control:
Sanitary improvements are most effective when dealing with these pests. Equipment and appliances in areas of moisture should be pulled out and cleaned behind. Drains should be thoroughly cleaned. A common misconception is to poor hot water and bleach down the drain. This will have not effect as the larva burrow deep into organic build up. There are several micro biological enzymes that can be used to maintain clean drains. These products eat away slime and sludge. Fruit fly traps will not rid a building of a problem; the breading sites must be eliminated for control.

Fun fact:
Predators of Fruit Flies include wasps, frogs, spiders, humming birds, chickens, and beetles.

Honey Bee

Description:
Worker bees are the most commonly seen members of the colony. They are female and measure about ¾ inch. They are a combination of brown and orange with tiny yellow hairs. Drone bees are males and are about 1 inch in length. Queens are larger and have the ability to fly.

Behavior:
Africanized Honey Bees could be referred to as super bees. They can produce honey very quickly and in high temperatures. Colonies can break off and swarm several times in one year. These bees often nest in areas close to the ground. They are considered a very dangerous and there are several deaths each year associated with them. Africanized Bees will attack in great numbers and not stop.

Control:
Our professional bee removal service is recommended when dealing with Africanized Honey Bees.

Fun fact:
Southern Arizona’s climate and landscape closely resembles Africa making Tucson a permanent home for Africanized Honey Bees.

Horse Fly

Description:
Horse Flies can range from ¼ inch to 1 ¼ inches in size. They can be black, grey, reddish, or brown. They are triangular in shape.

Behavior:
Horse Flies are a pest of both domestic and wild animals and occasionally to humans. Females deposit eggs above water or mud. When the larvae hatch, they fall into the water and feed on the aquatic life. The adult females have scissor like mouthparts. They use these to feed on the blood of animals. Males collect pollen and nectar, honeydew, or other liquids.

Control:
Control of this fly is difficult because it is capable of long flights. Eliminating possible breeding grounds is helpful. There are also specialized traps that can reduce the Horse Fly population is an area.

Fun fact:
Horse Flies can take up to two years to complete their life cycle.

House Fly

Description:
House Flies measure ¼ inch. They have four stripes on their thorax and the fly is dark gray in color. They are also covered with fine hairs.

Behavior:
The House Fly is considered a health risk because it can frequent manure and garbage. House Flies have sponging mouth parts they use to soak up their food. Because its food can only be in liquid form, the fly spews digestive fluids onto solid food and soaks it back up. House Flies primarily breed in animal manure. Areas with many agricultural settings frequently have high levels of fly populations.

Control:
Fly control is most successful when sanitation is addressed. Dog feces and garbage around a home and neighboring properties should be removed on a regular basis. Garbage cans must be tightly sealed at all times. House Flies indoors can be managed with specialized fly lights. Other methods include baits and fly paper.

Fun fact:
The House Fly is the most common fly in the world.

Mud Dauber

Description:
Mud Daubers range in color. They can be yellow and black or dark metallic blue. They are generally ½ to 1 inch in length with very long and thin waists.

Behavior:
Mud Daubers primarily feed on insects and spiders. The females collect mud to construct cylindrical shaped nests that are plastered to walls. The wasps will catch prey and seal it in the nest along with eggs. The eggs hatch and the larvae feed on the insects and spiders that were left for them. The Mud Dauber is not an aggressive wasp, but is equipped with a stinger.

Control:
This wasp tends to make its nest within vents and utility closets. A pest control program can target these areas.

Fun fact:
Some species of this insect will steal another wasp’s nest and replace the eggs with theirs.

Paper Wasp

Description:
Paper Wasps can range in color from bright yellow to crimson red. They can get over 1 inch in length and have black wings. They create paper-like comb nests that hang from a cellulose stem.

Behavior:
This is a social wasp. The queen starts a new colony in the spring. The colony will grow throughout the summer and peak in population in the fall. The colony will then produce new queens to start more colonies the following spring. Paper Wasps feed on flower nectar, small insects, and are often found skimming water off the surface of pools. These wasps can be very aggressive when protecting their nests. They are capable of stinging multiple times. Stings can cause redness, swelling, and even allergic reactions.

Control:
Paper Wasps are best controlled by eliminating their nests. This can be dangerous and should be handled by a pest control professional. Trapping wasps can also be effective if the nests cannot be located.

Fun fact:
Paper Wasps can often fly into a moving car in the summer causing accidents. If this ever happens, don’t panic, slowly pullover and release the wasp.

Bumble Bee

Description:
A bumble bee can be up to 1 inch in length. They are usually black with yellow stripes on the thorax and abdomen.

Behavior:
Bumble bees live in colonies. Each spring a queen will find an appropriate nesting site and form her colony. Nesting sites are often abandoned rodent burrows underneath concrete or wood piles. Her first eggs grow into workers that feed on pollen and nectar. The bees are capable of a painful sting when defending their nest. The colony produces several queens in the fall. These queens will begin new colonies in the spring season.

Control:
Reducing the amount of rodents and their burrows will help prevent bumblebees from nesting. A bumble bee can be aggressive, so control should be carried out by a professional. Direct insecticide applications to nest areas are very effective.

Fun fact:
Bumble bees do produce honey, but it is not edible to humans.

Clothes Moth

Description:
Adults are about 7–8 mm in length when the wings are folded back over the body. The wings are a golden buff color with a fringe of long hairs on the margins. The head has a tuft of reddish hairs. Mature larvae are 12–13 mm long. The bodies are white or cream with a brown head capsule.

Behavior:
It is common to find the larvae feeding under cuffs, collars, and other hidden parts of clothing. Mature larvae feed on woolens beneath a constructed blanket of silk, feces, and pieces of the food source.

Control:
If infested, clothing, blankets, and tapestries should be laundered or dry cleaned, and stored in an airtight container or bag. Small carpets and throw rugs can be beaten and brushed while hanging from an outside line to remove most, if not all, eggs and larvae. Large area rugs, carpets and large infestation should be treated by a professional.

Fun fact:
Depending on temperature and humidity, total developmental time (from egg to adult) varies from one to three months and can extend up to three or more years in some situations.

Drain Fly

Description:
Drain flies range from light gray to tan body and are about 1/16 inch long. The flies appear fuzzy because both the body and the wings are covered with long hairs. For this reason, they are also known as Moth Flies.

Behavior:
Drain Flies prefer the dark and are usually found on walls close to moisture sources. They lay their eggs in organic build-up typically found in drains. The larvae can survive extreme temperature swings and low levels of oxygen. They have jaws that enable them to burrow deep into layers of sludge and build-up.

Control:
Sanitary improvements are most effective when dealing with Drain Flies. Drains should be thoroughly cleaned. A common misconception is to poor hot water and bleach down the drain. This will have effect as the larva burrow deep into organic build up. There are several micro biological enzymes that can be used to maintain clean drains. These products eat away slime and sludge. Space fogging to knock down adults is not effective, the breading sites must be eliminated for control.

Fun fact:
In small numbers, Drain Fly Larvae are considered helpful because they break down materials that cause drain clogs.

Fruit Fly

Description:
Fruit Flies are 1/8 inch long. They are tan with red eyes. Their wings fold over their bodies.

Behavior:
Fruit Flies are commonly brought into buildings on fruits and vegetables. The larva feed on yeasts that are produced from ripening and decaying organic matter. Adults tend to rest close to their breeding sites.

Control:
Sanitary improvements are most effective when dealing with these pests. Equipment and appliances in areas of moisture should be pulled out and cleaned behind. Drains should be thoroughly cleaned. A common misconception is to poor hot water and bleach down the drain. This will have not effect as the larva burrow deep into organic build up. There are several micro biological enzymes that can be used to maintain clean drains. These products eat away slime and sludge. Fruit fly traps will not rid a building of a problem; the breading sites must be eliminated for control.

Fun fact:
Predators of Fruit Flies include wasps, frogs, spiders, humming birds, chickens, and beetles.

Honey Bee

Description:
Worker bees are the most commonly seen members of the colony. They are female and measure about ¾ inch. They are a combination of brown and orange with tiny yellow hairs. Drone bees are males and are about 1 inch in length. Queens are larger and have the ability to fly.

Behavior:
Africanized Honey Bees could be referred to as super bees. They can produce honey very quickly and in high temperatures. Colonies can break off and swarm several times in one year. These bees often nest in areas close to the ground. They are considered a very dangerous and there are several deaths each year associated with them. Africanized Bees will attack in great numbers and not stop.

Control:
Our professional bee removal service is recommended when dealing with Africanized Honey Bees.

Fun fact:
Southern Arizona’s climate and landscape closely resembles Africa making Tucson a permanent home for Africanized Honey Bees.

Horse Fly

Description:
Horse Flies can range from ¼ inch to 1 ¼ inches in size. They can be black, grey, reddish, or brown. They are triangular in shape.

Behavior:
Horse Flies are a pest of both domestic and wild animals and occasionally to humans. Females deposit eggs above water or mud. When the larvae hatch, they fall into the water and feed on the aquatic life. The adult females have scissor like mouthparts. They use these to feed on the blood of animals. Males collect pollen and nectar, honeydew, or other liquids.

Control:
Control of this fly is difficult because it is capable of long flights. Eliminating possible breeding grounds is helpful. There are also specialized traps that can reduce the Horse Fly population is an area.

Fun fact:
Horse Flies can take up to two years to complete their life cycle.

House Fly

Description:
House Flies measure ¼ inch. They have four stripes on their thorax and the fly is dark gray in color. They are also covered with fine hairs.

Behavior:
The House Fly is considered a health risk because it can frequent manure and garbage. House Flies have sponging mouth parts they use to soak up their food. Because its food can only be in liquid form, the fly spews digestive fluids onto solid food and soaks it back up. House Flies primarily breed in animal manure. Areas with many agricultural settings frequently have high levels of fly populations.

Control:
Fly control is most successful when sanitation is addressed. Dog feces and garbage around a home and neighboring properties should be removed on a regular basis. Garbage cans must be tightly sealed at all times. House Flies indoors can be managed with specialized fly lights. Other methods include baits and fly paper.

Fun fact:
The House Fly is the most common fly in the world.

Mud Dauber

Description:
Mud Daubers range in color. They can be yellow and black or dark metallic blue. They are generally ½ to 1 inch in length with very long and thin waists.

Behavior:
Mud Daubers primarily feed on insects and spiders. The females collect mud to construct cylindrical shaped nests that are plastered to walls. The wasps will catch prey and seal it in the nest along with eggs. The eggs hatch and the larvae feed on the insects and spiders that were left for them. The Mud Dauber is not an aggressive wasp, but is equipped with a stinger.

Control:
This wasp tends to make its nest within vents and utility closets. A pest control program can target these areas.

Fun fact:
Some species of this insect will steal another wasp’s nest and replace the eggs with theirs.

Paper Wasp

Description:
Paper Wasps can range in color from bright yellow to crimson red. They can get over 1 inch in length and have black wings. They create paper-like comb nests that hang from a cellulose stem.

Behavior:
This is a social wasp. The queen starts a new colony in the spring. The colony will grow throughout the summer and peak in population in the fall. The colony will then produce new queens to start more colonies the following spring. Paper Wasps feed on flower nectar, small insects, and are often found skimming water off the surface of pools. These wasps can be very aggressive when protecting their nests. They are capable of stinging multiple times. Stings can cause redness, swelling, and even allergic reactions.

Control:
Paper Wasps are best controlled by eliminating their nests. This can be dangerous and should be handled by a pest control professional. Trapping wasps can also be effective if the nests cannot be located.

Fun fact:
Paper Wasps can often fly into a moving car in the summer causing accidents. If this ever happens, don’t panic, slowly pullover and release the wasp.

Beetles

Carpet Beetle
Cricket
Earwig
Giant Centipede
House Centipede
Millipede
Pill Bug
Silverfish
Springtail

Carpet Beetle

Description:
Small, round insects normally less than 1/4 inch long. The larvae are covered with bristles and vary in size depending on species. Depending on the type , adults are a solid black while others can be spotted in color.

Behavior:
Carpet Beetle adults generally feed on pollen and plant substances. They have the ability to fly. Their larva are major fabric pest. Certain species can heavily damage wool clothing. Other species will chew carpet fibers and furniture fabrics. The larval stage can last up to 11 months before changing into an adult beetle.

Control:
Carpet Beetle problems can be prevented with good cleaning practices. Vacuuming pet hair from corners and carpet edges discourage theses issues. Pest control applications also reduce adults around the house and stop them from laying eggs in the house. Insecticide applications and removal of infested items can also prevent or remove these issues.

Fun Fact:
Although these beetles are a common fabric pest, their role in nature is to feed on decomposing animals.

Cricket

Description:
The adult house cricket is about ¾ inch long. They are yellowish-brown with 3 dark bands on the head.

Behavior:
House crickets are most active at night and are attracted to lights. There diet usually consists of organic plant matter, but they will feed on soft household materials such as cardboard. They frequently live together in groups in irrigation boxes and wall voids of buildings. Heavy cricket activity can be detected by small piles of black pellets where they rest in daytime hours. House crickets also have a loud chirp.

Control:
Common methods of prevention include shutting off exterior lighting when not in use or using yellow “bug” light bulbs. Sealing cracks and crevices around the building will also go a long way. Pest control maintenance is also a great way to manage crickets.

Fun fact:
The sound of singing crickets inside of a home is considered beautiful in some Asian countries.

Earwig

Description:
The Earwig ranges in color from reddish brown to black. They are equipped with a set of pincers on the back of their abdomen. They can be up to 1 inch in length.

Behavior:
Earwigs are nocturnal. They hide in cracks in damp areas during day time hours. They live under logs and rocks and in mulch in gardens. They eat insects and plant matter. When inside a building, earwigs are commonly found in dark damp places.

Control:
To prevent an infestation landscape timbers, logs, decorative stones, and firewood piles should be moved away from the foundation. Organic materials, leaves, and mulch should also be cleared away from the structure. Trees and shrubs that create shady moist areas should be trimmed back. A pest control maintenance program is also recommended. These applications target areas earwigs hide and feed.

Fun fact:
The old wives tale about earwigs crawling into the ears of people while they sleep is not true.

Giant Centipede

Description:
This centipede has 23 pairs of legs and can be 6.5 inches in length. Giant Centipedes are often tan and brown, but can have more vibrant colorations.

Behavior:
Giant Centipedes feed on small insects, larvae and spiders. They are most active at night and prefer moist conditions. They are equipped with two stingers that are used to paralyze their prey. This centipede is mainly found under rocks and lumber, but can occasionally enter a building through small openings.

Control:
To prevent a problem landscape timbers, logs, decorative stones, and firewood piles should be moved away from the foundation. Organic materials, leaves, and mulch should also be cleared away from the structure. Trees and shrubs that created shady moist areas should be trimmed back. A pest control maintenance program is also recommended. These applications target areas centipedes hide and feed.

Fun fact:
The largest Giant Centipede found in the southwest was over 12 inches in length.

House Centipede

Description:
House Centipedes can grow up to 1.5 inches. They have long, flattened bodies and 15 pairs of legs. They are grayish yellow with dark bands on their legs. The body has three long stripes.

Behavior:
House Centipedes feed on spiders and other insects inside homes. It can be scary in appearance, but it is actually harmless. The House Centipede is often found in basements, closets, and bathrooms. They can also run very quickly.

Control:
Organic materials, leaves, and mulch should be cleared away from the structure to help reduce the likelihood of a House Centipede problem. Also, moisture levels in basements and crawl spaces can be reduced with increased ventilation. A pest control maintenance program is also recommended. These applications target areas centipedes hide and feed.

Fun fact:
Most House Centipedes can live up to 6 years.

Millipede

Description:
Millipedes range from dark brown to black. They can be up to 5 inches in length and have 2 pairs of legs per body segment.

Behavior:
Millipedes need moisture to live. They are found living in moist vegetation, leaf litter, and mulch. They survive upon the decaying organic matter these areas are rich in. Millipedes are frequently found outside; however they can survive indoors in moist basements and crawl spaces.

Control:
Management begins with improved sanitation. Clean up leaf piles and raise potted plants. A pest control program will also help reduce millipedes.

Fun fact:
Under the right conditions, their “migrations” can occur. Where considerable amounts of decaying organic matter are found, such as thick leaf litter under trees or thick thatch layers in lawns, thousands of Millipedes might be produced.

Pill Bug

Description:
Pill Bugs are normally ¼ to ½ inch in size. They are gray in color with two antennae. They have a hard shell that covers their entire body.

Behavior:
Pill Bugs are active at night. They feed on decaying vegetable matter and prefer moist living conditions. These pests will usually quickly die in a structure from dehydration unless there is a moisture source like a leaky pipe. They will also inhabit basements and crawl spaces.

Control:
A pest control program is recommended for pill bug control. Other control measures include reducing moisture sources and plant cover close to the foundation of the building.

Fun fact:
This pest has the ability to roll up into a ball shape for protection.

Silverfish

Description:
Silverfish are shiny and grey. They range is size from ½ to 1 inch in length. They have 3 long bristles on their rear and 2 long antennae that curve.

Behavior:
These pests prefer to live in dark damp places such as basements, attics, kitchens and bathrooms. This pest is attracted to paper and damp clothes or fabric. This pest has been known to feed on paper, shampoos, glue in books, silk, and dead insects. They are also a major pest in stored foods.

Control:
Control measures involve targeting moist dark areas. Our pest control program is a great way to manage them. Reducing moisture in and around the building will greatly impact their populations.

Fun fact:
Despite their name, they are unable to swim.

Springtail

Description:
Springtails are very small insects. They are 1/16 inch in size. They range in color from gray to black. They have a spring-like tail and antennae that bend.

Behavior:
Springtails inhabit moist soil and feed on mold and fungus. It is common to find springtails under rocks, logs and potted plants. They can also be found inside buildings around drains with organic build-up. Springtails are often found in large number. This is because springtails develop very quickly. From the human perspective, springtails will look like a group of small light colored dots sporadically jumping.

Control:
Applying insecticides for springtail control is often a short-term solution. Moisture and food sources must be eliminated to get rid of this pest.

Fun fact:
Spring tails are capable of jumping 3 to 4 inches.

Carpet Beetle

Description:
Small, round insects normally less than 1/4 inch long. The larvae are covered with bristles and vary in size depending on species. Depending on the type , adults are a solid black while others can be spotted in color.

Behavior:
Carpet Beetle adults generally feed on pollen and plant substances. They have the ability to fly. Their larva are major fabric pest. Certain species can heavily damage wool clothing. Other species will chew carpet fibers and furniture fabrics. The larval stage can last up to 11 months before changing into an adult beetle.

Control:
Carpet Beetle problems can be prevented with good cleaning practices. Vacuuming pet hair from corners and carpet edges discourage theses issues. Pest control applications also reduce adults around the house and stop them from laying eggs in the house. Insecticide applications and removal of infested items can also prevent or remove these issues.

Fun Fact:
Although these beetles are a common fabric pest, their role in nature is to feed on decomposing animals.

Cricket

Description:
The adult house cricket is about ¾ inch long. They are yellowish-brown with 3 dark bands on the head.

Behavior:
House crickets are most active at night and are attracted to lights. There diet usually consists of organic plant matter, but they will feed on soft household materials such as cardboard. They frequently live together in groups in irrigation boxes and wall voids of buildings. Heavy cricket activity can be detected by small piles of black pellets where they rest in daytime hours. House crickets also have a loud chirp.

Control:
Common methods of prevention include shutting off exterior lighting when not in use or using yellow “bug” light bulbs. Sealing cracks and crevices around the building will also go a long way. Pest control maintenance is also a great way to manage crickets.

Fun fact:
The sound of singing crickets inside of a home is considered beautiful in some Asian countries.

Earwig

Description:
The Earwig ranges in color from reddish brown to black. They are equipped with a set of pincers on the back of their abdomen. They can be up to 1 inch in length.

Behavior:
Earwigs are nocturnal. They hide in cracks in damp areas during day time hours. They live under logs and rocks and in mulch in gardens. They eat insects and plant matter. When inside a building, earwigs are commonly found in dark damp places.

Control:
To prevent an infestation landscape timbers, logs, decorative stones, and firewood piles should be moved away from the foundation. Organic materials, leaves, and mulch should also be cleared away from the structure. Trees and shrubs that create shady moist areas should be trimmed back. A pest control maintenance program is also recommended. These applications target areas earwigs hide and feed.

Fun fact:
The old wives tale about earwigs crawling into the ears of people while they sleep is not true.

Giant Centipede

Description:
This centipede has 23 pairs of legs and can be 6.5 inches in length. Giant Centipedes are often tan and brown, but can have more vibrant colorations.

Behavior:
Giant Centipedes feed on small insects, larvae and spiders. They are most active at night and prefer moist conditions. They are equipped with two stingers that are used to paralyze their prey. This centipede is mainly found under rocks and lumber, but can occasionally enter a building through small openings.

Control:
To prevent a problem landscape timbers, logs, decorative stones, and firewood piles should be moved away from the foundation. Organic materials, leaves, and mulch should also be cleared away from the structure. Trees and shrubs that created shady moist areas should be trimmed back. A pest control maintenance program is also recommended. These applications target areas centipedes hide and feed.

Fun fact:
The largest Giant Centipede found in the southwest was over 12 inches in length.

Honey Bee

Description:
House Centipedes can grow up to 1.5 inches. They have long, flattened bodies and 15 pairs of legs. They are grayish yellow with dark bands on their legs. The body has three long stripes.

Behavior:
House Centipedes feed on spiders and other insects inside homes. It can be scary in appearance, but it is actually harmless. The House Centipede is often found in basements, closets, and bathrooms. They can also run very quickly.

Control:
Organic materials, leaves, and mulch should be cleared away from the structure to help reduce the likelihood of a House Centipede problem. Also, moisture levels in basements and crawl spaces can be reduced with increased ventilation. A pest control maintenance program is also recommended. These applications target areas centipedes hide and feed.

Fun fact:
Most House Centipedes can live up to 6 years.

Millipede

Description:
Millipedes range from dark brown to black. They can be up to 5 inches in length and have 2 pairs of legs per body segment.

Behavior:
Millipedes need moisture to live. They are found living in moist vegetation, leaf litter, and mulch. They survive upon the decaying organic matter these areas are rich in. Millipedes are frequently found outside; however they can survive indoors in moist basements and crawl spaces.

Control:
Management begins with improved sanitation. Clean up leaf piles and raise potted plants. A pest control program will also help reduce millipedes.

Fun fact:
Under the right conditions, their “migrations” can occur. Where considerable amounts of decaying organic matter are found, such as thick leaf litter under trees or thick thatch layers in lawns, thousands of Millipedes might be produced.

Pill Bug

Description:
Pill Bugs are normally ¼ to ½ inch in size. They are gray in color with two antennae. They have a hard shell that covers their entire body.

Behavior:
Pill Bugs are active at night. They feed on decaying vegetable matter and prefer moist living conditions. These pests will usually quickly die in a structure from dehydration unless there is a moisture source like a leaky pipe. They will also inhabit basements and crawl spaces.

Control:
A pest control program is recommended for pill bug control. Other control measures include reducing moisture sources and plant cover close to the foundation of the building.

Fun fact:
This pest has the ability to roll up into a ball shape for protection.

Silverfish

Description:
Silverfish are shiny and grey. They range is size from ½ to 1 inch in length. They have 3 long bristles on their rear and 2 long antennae that curve.

Behavior:
These pests prefer to live in dark damp places such as basements, attics, kitchens and bathrooms. This pest is attracted to paper and damp clothes or fabric. This pest has been known to feed on paper, shampoos, glue in books, silk, and dead insects. They are also a major pest in stored foods.

Control:
Control measures involve targeting moist dark areas. Our pest control program is a great way to manage them. Reducing moisture in and around the building will greatly impact their populations.

Fun fact:
Despite their name, they are unable to swim.

Springtail

Description:
Springtails are very small insects. They are 1/16 inch in size. They range in color from gray to black. They have a spring-like tail and antennae that bend.

Behavior:
Springtails inhabit moist soil and feed on mold and fungus. It is common to find springtails under rocks, logs and potted plants. They can also be found inside buildings around drains with organic build-up. Springtails are often found in large number. This is because springtails develop very quickly. From the human perspective, springtails will look like a group of small light colored dots sporadically jumping.

Control:
Applying insecticides for springtail control is often a short-term solution. Moisture and food sources must be eliminated to get rid of this pest.

Fun fact:
Spring tails are capable of jumping 3 to 4 inches.

Roaches

American Roach
Brown Banded Roach
German Roach
Oriental Roach

American Roach

Description:
This roach can grow to be 1 ½ inches long and can range from a light brown color to a dark red with a set of tan wings. Other common names include the water bug, sewer roach and the palmetto bug. American cockroach fecal matter can often be mistaken as mouse droppings.

Behavior:
When inside a structure, American roaches are often found in dark, moist areas. These places include crawlspaces, basements, floor drains, wall voids, pipe chases, and sewers. This roach can also flourish in outdoor environments. Popular locations include irrigation valve boxes, wood piles, under rocks, and around pool pump equipment. They prefer decaying organic matter for food, but will also feed on clothing, paper, book bindings, and even finger nails. This roach can survive for month with no water and 3 to 4 months without food.

Control:
Control can be achieved through a variety of methods. A complete inspection of the area is necessary to determine sanitation improvements, routes of entry, and major harborage areas. Reduction of food, water, and shelter certainly can discourage roaches. The use of residual insecticides, dusts, and bait materials can also be implemented for rapid population reduction and lasting control. Manholes are often targeted and treated with specialized products several times a year.

Fun Fact:
American roaches rarely use their wings to fly unless the temperature exceeds 85 degrees.

Brown Banded Roach

Description:
Adults are about ½ inch in size with two brownish-yellow bands on their wings. Nymphs have dark markings on their backs that look similar to the letter “H”.

Behavior:
Brown-Banded Cockroaches are commonly found in electrical sockets, behind picture frames and moldings, refrigerator motors, and light fixtures. This roach is commonly found in structures such as homes, apartments, hotels, and hospital rooms. Females carry their egg capsules for one to two days before they attach it to a hard surface. The eggs generally will hatch in 50 to 70 days. Each egg capsule contains about 18 roaches. One female produces 14 egg capsules in their adult life. Brown-Banded Cockroaches can easily be introduced to a structure by way of an egg capsule attached to a piece of furniture or box. Their diet is high in starches, but they have also been known to consume nylon stockings.

Control:
A thorough inspection must be conducted when treating for Brown-Banded Cockroaches. Sanitation is first on the list. Crumbs and other food debris must be cleaned away from all rooms in the building. Locating the roaches’ egg capsules and removing them is also needed in order to stop future infestations. Light fixtures and electrical sockets must be treated with baits, dusts, or residual materials.

Fun fact:
The Brown-Banded Cockroach has teasingly been called the Television Engineer, since they have often appeared as egg capsules or adult roaches on the inside of older style television screens.

German Roach

Description:
Adults are 0.5 – 0.625 inches long with wings and have two dark stripes on their back. Nymphs are darker than adults and do not have wings.

Behavior:
German Cockroaches prefer consistent temperatures between 70 to 80 degrees and are mostly active in nighttime hours. Daytime sightings can indicate high population levels. They prefer tight cracks and crevices close to food and moisture sources. They are most commonly seen in kitchen and bathrooms. Besides human food, German Cockroaches can also feed on paper, canvas, hair, fabric, glue, toothpaste, and even soap.

Control:
A thorough inspection and treatment is essential when dealing with German Cockroaches. Sanitation improvement is crucial. If this type of roach is deprived of food and water they will perish or move. The use of baits, dusts, insect growth regulators (IGRs), and residual insecticides are necessary for a complete control effort.

Fun fact:
One pregnant German Cockroach has the biological potential of starting a population of 63 million roaches over a period of one year.

Oriental Roach

Description:
Oriental Cockroaches are black and measure up to about 1 inch. The male cockroach has brown wings.

Behavior:
The cockroach will feed on garbage, sewage, and decaying organic matter. They are most active at night and prefer moist habitats. They are often found in basements, crawl spaces, and irrigation valve boxes. Adults live about 6 months and nymphs take about a year to fully develop.

Control:
Reducing moisture sources and harborages is a great way to prevent infestations of Oriental Cockroaches. Cracks and crevices can also be sealed up to stop them from entering a building. A pest control program will utilize baits, sprays, and granules to control this cockroach.

Fun fact:
The Oriental Cockroach is also known as the water bug, black beetle, and the shad roach.

American Roach

Description:
This roach can grow to be 1 ½ inches long and can range from a light brown color to a dark red with a set of tan wings. Other common names include the water bug, sewer roach and the palmetto bug. American cockroach fecal matter can often be mistaken as mouse droppings.

Behavior:
When inside a structure, American roaches are often found in dark, moist areas. These places include crawlspaces, basements, floor drains, wall voids, pipe chases, and sewers. This roach can also flourish in outdoor environments. Popular locations include irrigation valve boxes, wood piles, under rocks, and around pool pump equipment. They prefer decaying organic matter for food, but will also feed on clothing, paper, book bindings, and even finger nails. This roach can survive for month with no water and 3 to 4 months without food.

Control:
Control can be achieved through a variety of methods. A complete inspection of the area is necessary to determine sanitation improvements, routes of entry, and major harborage areas. Reduction of food, water, and shelter certainly can discourage roaches. The use of residual insecticides, dusts, and bait materials can also be implemented for rapid population reduction and lasting control. Manholes are often targeted and treated with specialized products several times a year.

Fun Fact:
American roaches rarely use their wings to fly unless the temperature exceeds 85 degrees.

Brown Banded Roach

Description:
Adults are about ½ inch in size with two brownish-yellow bands on their wings. Nymphs have dark markings on their backs that look similar to the letter “H”.

Behavior:
Brown-Banded Cockroaches are commonly found in electrical sockets, behind picture frames and moldings, refrigerator motors, and light fixtures. This roach is commonly found in structures such as homes, apartments, hotels, and hospital rooms. Females carry their egg capsules for one to two days before they attach it to a hard surface. The eggs generally will hatch in 50 to 70 days. Each egg capsule contains about 18 roaches. One female produces 14 egg capsules in their adult life. Brown-Banded Cockroaches can easily be introduced to a structure by way of an egg capsule attached to a piece of furniture or box. Their diet is high in starches, but they have also been known to consume nylon stockings.

Control:
A thorough inspection must be conducted when treating for Brown-Banded Cockroaches. Sanitation is first on the list. Crumbs and other food debris must be cleaned away from all rooms in the building. Locating the roaches’ egg capsules and removing them is also needed in order to stop future infestations. Light fixtures and electrical sockets must be treated with baits, dusts, or residual materials.

Fun fact:
The Brown-Banded Cockroach has teasingly been called the Television Engineer, since they have often appeared as egg capsules or adult roaches on the inside of older style television screens.

German Roach

Description:
Adults are 0.5 – 0.625 inches long with wings and have two dark stripes on their back. Nymphs are darker than adults and do not have wings.

Behavior:
German Cockroaches prefer consistent temperatures between 70 to 80 degrees and are mostly active in nighttime hours. Daytime sightings can indicate high population levels. They prefer tight cracks and crevices close to food and moisture sources. They are most commonly seen in kitchen and bathrooms. Besides human food, German Cockroaches can also feed on paper, canvas, hair, fabric, glue, toothpaste, and even soap.

Control:
A thorough inspection and treatment is essential when dealing with German Cockroaches. Sanitation improvement is crucial. If this type of roach is deprived of food and water they will perish or move. The use of baits, dusts, insect growth regulators (IGRs), and residual insecticides are necessary for a complete control effort.

Fun fact:
One pregnant German Cockroach has the biological potential of starting a population of 63 million roaches over a period of one year.

Oriental Roach

Description:
Oriental Cockroaches are black and measure up to about 1 inch. The male cockroach has brown wings.

Behavior:
The cockroach will feed on garbage, sewage, and decaying organic matter. They are most active at night and prefer moist habitats. They are often found in basements, crawl spaces, and irrigation valve boxes. Adults live about 6 months and nymphs take about a year to fully develop.

Control:
Reducing moisture sources and harborages is a great way to prevent infestations of Oriental Cockroaches. Cracks and crevices can also be sealed up to stop them from entering a building. A pest control program will utilize baits, sprays, and granules to control this cockroach.

Fun fact:
The Oriental Cockroach is also known as the water bug, black beetle, and the shad roach.

Rodents

House Mouse
Norway Rat
Pack Rat
Pocket Gopher

House Mouse

Description:
The House Mouse can get up to 4 inches long with an equally long tail. This mouse ranges from gray to light brown. They leave behind small black droppings.

Behavior:
House Mice live inside and outside buildings. With only an 18 day period of gestation, they are very prolific breeders. They will have between 5 to 7 young per litter. They will feed on various things including, bread, seeds, sweets, and grains. They can nest in any undisturbed space. House Mice can climb vertical walls and can jump up to 3 feet high. They are most active at night.

Control:
Improved sanitation will reduce the chances of having a mouse problem. Seal cracks and crevices and make sure doors tightly shut. When mice are present, strategically placing traps is a great way to control them. If possible, nesting sites should be professionally removed and cleaned.

Fun Fact:
House Mice are often used in scientific experiments because their physiology is very similar to humans.

Norway Rat

Description:
Norway Rats range from brown, gray, and black and measure up to 12 inches. Their tails are semi-naked and are shorter than the length of the body.

Behavior:
Norway Rats are omnivorous and feed on meats, fruits, grain and nuts. They live in colonies close to a water source. Norway Rats live in communities with one dominant member. This rat will live in debris piles and in underground burrows. They can enter structures through quarter-sized holes and nest in insulation. Norway rats are considered a health risk because they can also live in unsanitary places such as sewers.

Control:
Controlling Norway Rats is situational specific. Sanitation is usually the first step. This involves cleaning up debris, fixing water leaks, and eliminating food sources. Rodent-proofing is also an effective control measure. This involves sealing gaps and eliminating potential climbing points. Rodenticide baiting programs are effective in large populations. Trapping is often used when dealing with a low population of Norway Rats in a structure.

Fun fact:
The Norway Rat was brought to the United States by European settlers in 1775. It is now the most widely distributed rat species in the country.

Pack Rat

Description:
The Pack Rat measures 6 to 7 inches. They are brownish grey with a bright white under coat. Their tails are about 5 to 6 inches in length with fine hair, and they have very large eyes and ears.

Behavior:
The Pack Rat is very well known for the giant mess they can make. This rat will collect cactus, sticks, and any other small object and pile on top of its nest. It is common for these rats to live in prickly pear cactus for protection. However, they are excellent climbers and can easily in habit an attic, wall void, or crawl space. They primarily feed on seeds, grasses, and cacti. This rat is active at night.

Control:
Pack Rat control is best achieved by removing the rodents from an area first. This can be done through rodenticide bating or trapping. Once the Pack Rats have been eliminated, any dens they have created are physically removed. Preventative measures include keeping landscapes trimmed back, throwing away fallen fruits, and sealing gaps and other entry points around the home.

Fun fact:
Pack Rats are attracted to shiny objects. In fact, if they find a shinier object than the one it has, it will replace the old object with the new shiny one.

Pocket Gopher

Description:
The Pocket Gopher measures 5 to 14 inches. Its color can range from black to light brown to even white. They have a set of two fur-lined pouches outside of its mouth that are used to carry food.

Behavior:
The Pocket Gopher is extremely adapted to under ground living. The gopher digs networks of tunnels under lawns and gardens. They can be identified by the horseshoe shaped mounds they create when pushing dirt from the tunnels. They are most active in the spring and fall when temperatures are right. Females will have up to 2 litters of 4 pups per year.

Control:
There are multiple methods to control these pests. One way is with the use of smoke cartridges. The cartridges release a deadly gas into the burrow systems. Another method is the use of baits. A bait material is injected into the tunnels for the gophers to eat.

Fun fact:
Pocket Gophers can have tunnels that extend over 100 feet.

House Mouse

Description:
The House Mouse can get up to 4 inches long with an equally long tail. This mouse ranges from gray to light brown. They leave behind small black droppings.

Behavior:
House Mice live inside and outside buildings. With only an 18 day period of gestation, they are very prolific breeders. They will have between 5 to 7 young per litter. They will feed on various things including, bread, seeds, sweets, and grains. They can nest in any undisturbed space. House Mice can climb vertical walls and can jump up to 3 feet high. They are most active at night.

Control:
Improved sanitation will reduce the chances of having a mouse problem. Seal cracks and crevices and make sure doors tightly shut. When mice are present, strategically placing traps is a great way to control them. If possible, nesting sites should be professionally removed and cleaned.

Fun Fact:
House Mice are often used in scientific experiments because their physiology is very similar to humans.

Norway Rat

Description:
Norway Rats range from brown, gray, and black and measure up to 12 inches. Their tails are semi-naked and are shorter than the length of the body.

Behavior:
Norway Rats are omnivorous and feed on meats, fruits, grain and nuts. They live in colonies close to a water source. Norway Rats live in communities with one dominant member. This rat will live in debris piles and in underground burrows. They can enter structures through quarter-sized holes and nest in insulation. Norway rats are considered a health risk because they can also live in unsanitary places such as sewers.

Control:
Controlling Norway Rats is situational specific. Sanitation is usually the first step. This involves cleaning up debris, fixing water leaks, and eliminating food sources. Rodent-proofing is also an effective control measure. This involves sealing gaps and eliminating potential climbing points. Rodenticide baiting programs are effective in large populations. Trapping is often used when dealing with a low population of Norway Rats in a structure.

Fun fact:
The Norway Rat was brought to the United States by European settlers in 1775. It is now the most widely distributed rat species in the country.

Pack Rat

Description:
The Pack Rat measures 6 to 7 inches. They are brownish grey with a bright white under coat. Their tails are about 5 to 6 inches in length with fine hair, and they have very large eyes and ears.

Behavior:
The Pack Rat is very well known for the giant mess they can make. This rat will collect cactus, sticks, and any other small object and pile on top of its nest. It is common for these rats to live in prickly pear cactus for protection. However, they are excellent climbers and can easily in habit an attic, wall void, or crawl space. They primarily feed on seeds, grasses, and cacti. This rat is active at night.

Control:
Pack Rat control is best achieved by removing the rodents from an area first. This can be done through rodenticide bating or trapping. Once the Pack Rats have been eliminated, any dens they have created are physically removed. Preventative measures include keeping landscapes trimmed back, throwing away fallen fruits, and sealing gaps and other entry points around the home.

Fun fact:
Pack Rats are attracted to shiny objects. In fact, if they find a shinier object than the one it has, it will replace the old object with the new shiny one.

Pocket Gopher

Description:
The Pocket Gopher measures 5 to 14 inches. Its color can range from black to light brown to even white. They have a set of two fur-lined pouches outside of its mouth that are used to carry food.

Behavior:
The Pocket Gopher is extremely adapted to under ground living. The gopher digs networks of tunnels under lawns and gardens. They can be identified by the horseshoe shaped mounds they create when pushing dirt from the tunnels. They are most active in the spring and fall when temperatures are right. Females will have up to 2 litters of 4 pups per year.

Control:
There are multiple methods to control these pests. One way is with the use of smoke cartridges. The cartridges release a deadly gas into the burrow systems. Another method is the use of baits. A bait material is injected into the tunnels for the gophers to eat.

Fun fact:
Pocket Gophers can have tunnels that extend over 100 feet.

Scorpions

Bark Scorpion
Desert Hairy Scorpion
Striped Scorpion

Bark Scorpion

Description:
Generally between ¼” – 3” and light tan in color, this is the most common scorpion in southern Arizona. The venom in this scorpion contains a potent neurotoxin. It has two slender claws and a tiny black dot above its stinger.

Behavior:
The bark scorpion is an excellent climber. This scorpion is commonly encountered running up walls or on ceilings in structures. Some favorite resting areas for this scorpion is under tree bark or palm fronds. The bark scorpion is nocturnal and is active in Arizona year round. It will feed on many different soft bodied insects and arachnids including other scorpions. Female scorpions give birth to live scorpions that stay on her back for a short period of time.

Control:
A thorough inspection and integrated approach is required for scorpion control. Scorpions are hardy creatures and pesticide applications only are not likely to eliminate their presence in or around a structure. Sanitation is a key element in reducing the likelihood of a problem. Some examples include cleaning up piles of leaves, wood, or other cellulose debris around the foundation of the home. Palm trees should be trimmed regularly and skinned. Any trees touching the structure must be cut back. Exclusion is also very important. Cracks, crevices, gaps, and voids must be sealed off with caulking and fine screening. Doors need to be tight fitting and vents screened. The final step is food source reduction, minimizing the amount of general pest insects around the property that scorpions prey on. When these steps are taken, scorpions are less likely to infest a home or business.

Fun Fact:
Bark scorpions will glow in the dark with the use of an ultra violet (black light) flashlight.

Desert Hairy Scorpion

Description:
This is largest scorpion in the desert southwest measuring up to 6 inches. Its body is a dark brown with yellowish legs, pinchers, and tail. It is also covered with long spiny hairs.

Behavior:
The Desert Hairy Scorpion is active at night. They live in small oval shaped burrows and under rocks or wood piles. This scorpion relies heavily on its strong pinchers to immobilize small insects. For this reason, the Desert Hairy does not have a deadly type of venom.

Control:
Managing Desert Hairy Scorpions requires improved sanitation around a property. Some examples include moving rock piles further from the structure and cleaning up piles of leaves, wood, or other cellulose debris around the foundation of the home. Exclusion is also very important, so doors need to be tight fitting. Pest control applications include a thorough perimeter treatment, dusting entry points, and granulating the yard. This application will also reduce their food source, other insects.

Fun fact:
Desert Hairy Scorpions carry their young on their backs for their first 30 days.

Striped Scorpion

Description:
The Striped Scorpion is yellowish-tan. It can grow to be 2 ¼ inches in length. The body of this scorpion is sprinkled with straight hairs and there are light stripes on the tail.

Behavior:
Striped Scorpions prefer to live under rocks or wood piles. This scorpion uses its strong pinchers and sting when attacking its prey. Striped Scorpions are not considered a deadly scorpion, but they do have a painful sting.

Control:
Scorpions can be better managed with improved sanitation around a property. Some examples include cleaning up piles of leaves, wood, or other cellulose debris around the foundation of the home. Exclusion is also very important, so doors need to be tight fitting. Pest control applications include granulating the yard, dusting entry points, and a thorough perimeter treatment. This application will also reduce the scorpions food source, other insects.

Fun fact:
The Striped Scorpion is also known as the Devil Back Scorpion.

Bark Scorpion

Description:
Generally between ¼” – 3” and light tan in color, this is the most common scorpion in southern Arizona. The venom in this scorpion contains a potent neurotoxin. It has two slender claws and a tiny black dot above its stinger.

Behavior:
The bark scorpion is an excellent climber. This scorpion is commonly encountered running up walls or on ceilings in structures. Some favorite resting areas for this scorpion is under tree bark or palm fronds. The bark scorpion is nocturnal and is active in Arizona year round. It will feed on many different soft bodied insects and arachnids including other scorpions. Female scorpions give birth to live scorpions that stay on her back for a short period of time.

Control:
A thorough inspection and integrated approach is required for scorpion control. Scorpions are hardy creatures and pesticide applications only are not likely to eliminate their presence in or around a structure. Sanitation is a key element in reducing the likelihood of a problem. Some examples include cleaning up piles of leaves, wood, or other cellulose debris around the foundation of the home. Palm trees should be trimmed regularly and skinned. Any trees touching the structure must be cut back. Exclusion is also very important. Cracks, crevices, gaps, and voids must be sealed off with caulking and fine screening. Doors need to be tight fitting and vents screened. The final step is food source reduction, minimizing the amount of general pest insects around the property that scorpions prey on. When these steps are taken, scorpions are less likely to infest a home or business.

Fun Fact:
Bark scorpions will glow in the dark with the use of an ultra violet (black light) flashlight.

Desert Hairy Scorpion

Description:
This is largest scorpion in the desert southwest measuring up to 6 inches. Its body is a dark brown with yellowish legs, pinchers, and tail. It is also covered with long spiny hairs.

Behavior:
The Desert Hairy Scorpion is active at night. They live in small oval shaped burrows and under rocks or wood piles. This scorpion relies heavily on its strong pinchers to immobilize small insects. For this reason, the Desert Hairy does not have a deadly type of venom.

Control:
Managing Desert Hairy Scorpions requires improved sanitation around a property. Some examples include moving rock piles further from the structure and cleaning up piles of leaves, wood, or other cellulose debris around the foundation of the home. Exclusion is also very important, so doors need to be tight fitting. Pest control applications include a thorough perimeter treatment, dusting entry points, and granulating the yard. This application will also reduce their food source, other insects.

Fun fact:
Desert Hairy Scorpions carry their young on their backs for their first 30 days.

Striped Scorpion

Description:
The Striped Scorpion is yellowish-tan. It can grow to be 2 ¼ inches in length. The body of this scorpion is sprinkled with straight hairs and there are light stripes on the tail.

Behavior:
Striped Scorpions prefer to live under rocks or wood piles. This scorpion uses its strong pinchers and sting when attacking its prey. Striped Scorpions are not considered a deadly scorpion, but they do have a painful sting.

Control:
Scorpions can be better managed with improved sanitation around a property. Some examples include cleaning up piles of leaves, wood, or other cellulose debris around the foundation of the home. Exclusion is also very important, so doors need to be tight fitting. Pest control applications include granulating the yard, dusting entry points, and a thorough perimeter treatment. This application will also reduce the scorpions food source, other insects.

Fun fact:
The Striped Scorpion is also known as the Devil Back Scorpion.

Spiders

AZ Brown Spider
Black Widow
Tarantula

AZ Brown Spider

Description:
This spider ranges from a yellowish tan to brown and can be up to 1 ½ inches in size. This species is closely related to the Brown Recluse Spider. Its venom contains powerful cytotoxins that cause large ulcerous soars.

Behavior:
Arizona Brown Spiders are hunters. They move from place to place in search of small insects to feed on. They prefer to hide in daytime hours. When inside a building, clutter is very attractive to this spider for hiding. They have also been found hiding in shoes, clothing, and boxes. Most bites occur when the spider is accidentally trapped against the skin.

Control:
This spider is excellent at hiding. The most effective form of inspection and detection is done with the use of glue boards. The traps are placed throughout the structure and checked a few days later. Sanitation improvement is also a crucial factor. Reducing clutter and stored items will discourage this spider. This spider can also be kept outside by sealing cracks and crevices around the building and making sure all doors and windows are tight fitting. Treatments should target entry points, underneath furniture and appliances, and crevices.

Fun Fact:
This spider is also known as the Fiddle-back Spider and violin spider because violin-shaped marking on its back.

Black Widow

Description:
Black Widows are shiny and black. The body can measure up to ¾ of an inch. Females can be identified by the distinct red hour glass shape on the underside of their abdomen. Males are smaller with light streaks on their abdomens.

Behavior:
Black Widows are the most venomous spiders in North America. Bites are very painful and take days to subside. Black Widows prefer dark secluded areas such as wood piles, basements, crawl spaces, foundations, and beneath patios. They build their irregular but strong webs low to the ground. The average life span of a female is 6 months. Widow Spiders get their name because the female frequently kills the male after mating.

Control:
Spider management starts with a good inspection. Sanitation goes a long way, moving debris away from the foundation of the home reduces food and harborage for black widows. Sealing cracks and crevices around the perimeter of the structure is also very effective. Live Black Widows can be removed by way of vacuuming (caution needs to be taken when opening the vacuum). A reoccurring thorough perimeter treatment with a residual insecticide gives excellent control.

Fun fact:
The Black Widow Spider has the strongest web out of any other spider.

Tarantula

Description:
The Tarantula is a large spider that is covered with hair. The male is dark brown while the females are tan. Their bodies are 2 ½ inches and their legs can be up to 4 inches in length. They have 8 eyes and 2 fangs.

Behavior:
Tarantulas are passive hunters. They wait close to their burrows to ambush passing insects. Tarantulas live in underground burrows. These burrows can be in the open or underneath a landscape timber or rock. The holes can be easily identified by the thick web that has been spun over the opening. Tarantulas are active at night.

Control:
The Tarantula is viewed as a beneficial organism because it feeds on pest insects such as the cricket or cockroach. This spider rarely ventures inside a home. Reducing the amount of insects around a building with our pest control programs is an effective way to manage this spider.

Fun fact:
Male Tarantulas will travel great distances in search of a female mate.

AZ Brown Spider

Description:
This spider ranges from a yellowish tan to brown and can be up to 1 ½ inches in size. This species is closely related to the Brown Recluse Spider. Its venom contains powerful cytotoxins that cause large ulcerous soars.

Behavior:
Arizona Brown Spiders are hunters. They move from place to place in search of small insects to feed on. They prefer to hide in daytime hours. When inside a building, clutter is very attractive to this spider for hiding. They have also been found hiding in shoes, clothing, and boxes. Most bites occur when the spider is accidentally trapped against the skin.

Control:
This spider is excellent at hiding. The most effective form of inspection and detection is done with the use of glue boards. The traps are placed throughout the structure and checked a few days later. Sanitation improvement is also a crucial factor. Reducing clutter and stored items will discourage this spider. This spider can also be kept outside by sealing cracks and crevices around the building and making sure all doors and windows are tight fitting. Treatments should target entry points, underneath furniture and appliances, and crevices.

Fun Fact:
This spider is also known as the Fiddle-back Spider and violin spider because violin-shaped marking on its back.

Black Widow

Description:
Black Widows are shiny and black. The body can measure up to ¾ of an inch. Females can be identified by the distinct red hour glass shape on the underside of their abdomen. Males are smaller with light streaks on their abdomens.

Behavior:
Black Widows are the most venomous spiders in North America. Bites are very painful and take days to subside. Black Widows prefer dark secluded areas such as wood piles, basements, crawl spaces, foundations, and beneath patios. They build their irregular but strong webs low to the ground. The average life span of a female is 6 months. Widow Spiders get their name because the female frequently kills the male after mating.

Control:
Spider management starts with a good inspection. Sanitation goes a long way, moving debris away from the foundation of the home reduces food and harborage for black widows. Sealing cracks and crevices around the perimeter of the structure is also very effective. Live Black Widows can be removed by way of vacuuming (caution needs to be taken when opening the vacuum). A reoccurring thorough perimeter treatment with a residual insecticide gives excellent control.

Fun fact:
The Black Widow Spider has the strongest web out of any other spider.

Tarantula

Description:
The Tarantula is a large spider that is covered with hair. The male is dark brown while the females are tan. Their bodies are 2 ½ inches and their legs can be up to 4 inches in length. They have 8 eyes and 2 fangs.

Behavior:
Tarantulas are passive hunters. They wait close to their burrows to ambush passing insects. Tarantulas live in underground burrows. These burrows can be in the open or underneath a landscape timber or rock. The holes can be easily identified by the thick web that has been spun over the opening. Tarantulas are active at night.

Control:
The Tarantula is viewed as a beneficial organism because it feeds on pest insects such as the cricket or cockroach. This spider rarely ventures inside a home. Reducing the amount of insects around a building with our pest control programs is an effective way to manage this spider.

Fun fact:
Male Tarantulas will travel great distances in search of a female mate.

Termites

Drywood Termite
Subterranean Termite

Drywood Termite

Description:
The Drywood Termite can be up to ½ inch in length. Reproductive termites take the place of workers when they are nymphs. The reproductive class has two pairs of equal size wings and is reddish brown in color. Soldiers have long dark heads with two black mandibles.

Behavior:
Because Drywood Termites are social insects, they live in colonies. The colonies are made up of kings, queens and soldiers. There is no worker caste in a Drywood Termite colony. The work is done by the nymphs before they become adults. King and queen termites perform the reproductive functions of the colony. Soldiers guard the colony against predators such as ants or other insects. While soldiers nymphs remain inside the wood at all times, the reproductive caste will swarm in certain times of the year to make new colonies. Drywood Termites nest above ground in sound wood. An infestation is identified by piles of light and dark colored fecal pellets.

Control:
The chances of a Drywood Termite infestation can be reduced by storing fire wood and lumber away from a structure. Fine screening should be installed on all windows and ventilation openings for attics and crawl spaces. Any exposed wood should be sealed with varnish or paint to prevent termite access. Nail holes and cracks should also be sealed. Large infestations of Drywood Termites are exterminated by tenting a building and pumping a fumigant inside. Alternative methods include thermal remediation, liquid nitrogen, and spot treating with a borate.

Fun Fact:
Drywood Termites are one of the few species of termite that cut across the grain when infesting wood.

Subterranean Termite

Description:
Subterranean Termites have 5 castes; worker, soldier, swarmer, queen, and king. The workers range from 1/8 to 3/8 inch and are creamy white in color. The soldiers have dark elongated heads with large mandibles. The swarmers are black with 2 pairs of overlapping wings. The kings are larger and black. The queen termites are black with black and white abdomens. They are the largest member of the colony.

Behavior:
Subterranean Termites live in colonies that are under ground. They construct tunnels out of fecal matter and soil called shelter tubes. Shelter tubes give these Termites the ability to feed on food sources above the ground while being protected from the weather and predators. Workers feed on wood and other cellulose materials. There is a protozoa in their gut that converts the materials into nutrients. Colonies can reach numbers of over a million Termites. These Termites are very common and are Arizona’s # 1 urban pest.

Control:
Subterranean Termites can be controlled by applying a liquid termiticide barrier at the foundation of a structure. This barrier protects the building from the Termites tunneling up and into the framing. Another form of treatment is a baiting system. A baiting system is installed around a building for Termites to find and eat. The bait is taken back the colony and will kill all the inhabitants. Preventative measures involve moving firewood away from the home, reduce moisture around the perimeter, and making sure the foundation is clearly visible.

Fun fact:
Worker Termites are responsible for feeding their higher caste members. They do this by regurgitating their food after it is digested. This process is called “trophalaxis”.

Drywood Termite

Description:
The Drywood Termite can be up to ½ inch in length. Reproductive termites take the place of workers when they are nymphs. The reproductive class has two pairs of equal size wings and is reddish brown in color. Soldiers have long dark heads with two black mandibles.

Behavior:
Because Drywood Termites are social insects, they live in colonies. The colonies are made up of kings, queens and soldiers. There is no worker caste in a Drywood Termite colony. The work is done by the nymphs before they become adults. King and queen termites perform the reproductive functions of the colony. Soldiers guard the colony against predators such as ants or other insects. While soldiers nymphs remain inside the wood at all times, the reproductive caste will swarm in certain times of the year to make new colonies. Drywood Termites nest above ground in sound wood. An infestation is identified by piles of light and dark colored fecal pellets.

Control:
The chances of a Drywood Termite infestation can be reduced by storing fire wood and lumber away from a structure. Fine screening should be installed on all windows and ventilation openings for attics and crawl spaces. Any exposed wood should be sealed with varnish or paint to prevent termite access. Nail holes and cracks should also be sealed. Large infestations of Drywood Termites are exterminated by tenting a building and pumping a fumigant inside. Alternative methods include thermal remediation, liquid nitrogen, and spot treating with a borate.

Fun Fact:
Drywood Termites are one of the few species of termite that cut across the grain when infesting wood.

Subterranean Termite

Description:
Subterranean Termites have 5 castes; worker, soldier, swarmer, queen, and king. The workers range from 1/8 to 3/8 inch and are creamy white in color. The soldiers have dark elongated heads with large mandibles. The swarmers are black with 2 pairs of overlapping wings. The kings are larger and black. The queen termites are black with black and white abdomens. They are the largest member of the colony.

Behavior:
Subterranean Termites live in colonies that are under ground. They construct tunnels out of fecal matter and soil called shelter tubes. Shelter tubes give these Termites the ability to feed on food sources above the ground while being protected from the weather and predators. Workers feed on wood and other cellulose materials. There is a protozoa in their gut that converts the materials into nutrients. Colonies can reach numbers of over a million Termites. These Termites are very common and are Arizona’s # 1 urban pest.

Control:
Subterranean Termites can be controlled by applying a liquid termiticide barrier at the foundation of a structure. This barrier protects the building from the Termites tunneling up and into the framing. Another form of treatment is a baiting system. A baiting system is installed around a building for Termites to find and eat. The bait is taken back the colony and will kill all the inhabitants. Preventative measures involve moving firewood away from the home, reduce moisture around the perimeter, and making sure the foundation is clearly visible.

Fun fact:
Worker Termites are responsible for feeding their higher caste members. They do this by regurgitating their food after it is digested. This process is called “trophalaxis”.
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